Author Topic: General anesthesia  (Read 6245 times)

jerseygirl

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General anesthesia
« on: February 09, 2007, 05:32:16 pm »
Hi, everybody,

Does anybody have any idea what drugs are used in general anesthesia during AN surgery?

                    Eve
Right side AN (6x3x3 cm) removed in 1988 by Drs. Benjamin & Cohen at NYU (16 hrs); nerves involved III - XII.
Regrowth at the brainstem 2.5 cm removed by Dr.Shahinian in 4 hrs at SBI (hopefully, this time forever); nerves involved IV - X with VIII missing. No facial or swallowing issues.

krbonner

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Re: General anesthesia
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2007, 06:57:23 pm »
I just looked through all my operative reports, and could find nothing that specified the names of the actual drugs or dosages that were administered.  Is that the kind of detail you're looking for?

Katie
diagnosed June 2005
2.3cmx1.6cmx1.4cm left AN
translab Sept 13, 2006; Drs. McKenna and Barker in MA (MEEI/MGH)

jerseygirl

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Re: General anesthesia
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2007, 09:23:00 pm »
Thanks for your answer. Katie. Yes, I was wondering about the actual drugs and dosages. I did not think it would be in the actual operating report. I was hoping someone would remember talking to anesthesiologist because they are required to tell patients. I can understand though how this pre-op conversation can be easily forgotten after the surgery is over unless someone had a reaction to an anesthetic.

                       Eve
Right side AN (6x3x3 cm) removed in 1988 by Drs. Benjamin & Cohen at NYU (16 hrs); nerves involved III - XII.
Regrowth at the brainstem 2.5 cm removed by Dr.Shahinian in 4 hrs at SBI (hopefully, this time forever); nerves involved IV - X with VIII missing. No facial or swallowing issues.

Boppie

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Re: General anesthesia
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2007, 09:41:46 pm »
When I was on the guerney I had a conversation about an airway tube with the anesthesiologist.  I asked them to use a small tube so as to not injure my vocal cords.  I do remember being questioned by the same anesthesiologist if I was allergic to any meds and if I had any difficulty breathing and what pills or meds or food had I taken that morning.  I remember reminding them that I had naturally low blood pressure.  The questioning was very thorough.  I remember it all.  I remember having my surgeon look at my ink marks on the ear and abdominal incision site and reassuring me.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2007, 08:59:51 am by Boppie »

tony

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Re: General anesthesia
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2007, 04:40:06 am »
I guess the first point about an AN OP is that it can go 12-14 hours at
the long end (equally I know folk who were in and out in under 8 hrs)
This can mean quite a large dose is required - with each case different.
If you have a history of poor reactions or allergies then best to raise
them before the big day.
So are you having any strange "post op " reactions ?
(or cravings for banana pizza perhaps ?)
They say it takes about a month for every hour you were under (?)
to completely flush out from the system
- so maybe a while yet..
Best regards
Tony

Cheryl R

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Re: General anesthesia
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2007, 09:03:49 am »
Hi Eve.      Are you asking out of curiousity or because you have had a problem with a certain drug?             I asked this back with my 2001 surgery and the resident was a young gal who rattled off a list of potential drugs they use.               I am not sure if a hospital would have a certain protocol of drugs used for a certain type of surgery or if the person doing the anesthetic has his own favorites depending on the procedure being done,length of procedure,pt's body weight,allergies,etc.                      I am a nurse in a small hospital and I have never seen the nurse anesthetist tell a pt what drugs they would use or have I ever seen a pt ask actually.
 If it is just because you are curious,then ask after your surgery what was given as it will be written on your chart and your nurse can look it up.         
                                                                 Cheryl R                     
Right mid fossa 11-01-01
  left tumor found 5-03,so have NF2
  trans lab for right facial nerve tumor
  with nerve graft 3-23-06
   CSF leak revision surgery 4-07-06
   left mid fossa 4-17-08
   near deaf on left before surgery
   with hearing much improved .
    Univ of Iowa for all care

jerseygirl

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Re: General anesthesia
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2007, 11:29:43 am »
Cheryl,

I just read that an inhalational anestheic called isoflurane contributes to Alzheimer's down the road and is risky in elderly patients who can wake up suffering from dementia. I am not an elderly patient but I am not 25 either and my brain has taken quite a lot of abuse already. Another anesthetic, propofol, is for deep anesthesia and is actually neuroprotective. I was told what was used when I had a few surgeries for other things but I forgot since I did not write it down. Maybe memory problems people experience after AN surgeries are related to aneathesia more rather than the surgery itself.

I remember when I was at NYU after my first surgery 18 years ago, an 80 year old woman came in for a pituitary surgery. She was sharp as a wistle, energetic, optimistic, great attitude. After surgery, she was completely demented. It was extremely depressing. I cried because I had one complication after another and couldn't get out of the hospital and then cried because I saw what was happening to her (we were in the same room).  The surgeon was shocked saying that the surgery was textbook, everything worked out in the patient's favor and it took less time than expected.

Maybe, we, patients, should learn about anesthesia meds used in surgery because this is just as important as the approach used. I can see why radiation is recommended for elderly AN patients: it is probably because of the dangers of anesthesia in addition to those of the surgery.

Forgive me but I still have nightmares about my first experience, it can probably qualify as Postraumatic stress disorder. Now that the second surgery is approaching, I obviously have flashbacks and my anxiety is building. I understand that the techniques improved greatly and surgery times are shorter and people overall have easier time afterwards ( except for huge tumors like Chelsea's and Chris's for example) than I did but I also feel compelled posing this question. Thank you fo all your replies!

            Eve
Right side AN (6x3x3 cm) removed in 1988 by Drs. Benjamin & Cohen at NYU (16 hrs); nerves involved III - XII.
Regrowth at the brainstem 2.5 cm removed by Dr.Shahinian in 4 hrs at SBI (hopefully, this time forever); nerves involved IV - X with VIII missing. No facial or swallowing issues.

Cheryl R

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Re: General anesthesia
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2007, 11:57:20 am »
Eve,    Interesting info.        I have seen many,many post op elderly have confusion with stronger pain meds and who cleared up once they were off the meds.  Sometimes just being out of their usual environment can cause confusion.   Electroltye imbalance can also.  Each pt has to be evaulated for their particular risks.                     I have heard it said if one was on the brink of possible dementia than a major surgery can be the factor which pushes them into it.   
  Our simple hip fracture pts ususally get spinal anesthetic which does help some.   
Good luck with your research and hope you get rhe answers you want.
                                                  Cheryl R
Right mid fossa 11-01-01
  left tumor found 5-03,so have NF2
  trans lab for right facial nerve tumor
  with nerve graft 3-23-06
   CSF leak revision surgery 4-07-06
   left mid fossa 4-17-08
   near deaf on left before surgery
   with hearing much improved .
    Univ of Iowa for all care

Kathleen_Mc

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Re: General anesthesia
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2007, 04:09:41 am »
Eve: As a nurse I have never known a patient to develope dementia directly from anaestic. medications, that is not to say that people aren't able to recall things that happened immediately before or soon after the medication. I have known, particularly in the older population, pain medications to cause a problem of this nature.
I personally would not debate with the doctor what drug he should use, he's the professional and knows what is best (unless I had previously had a bad reaction to one).
Kathleen
1st AN surgery @ age 23, 16 hours
Loss of 7-10th nerves
mulitple "plastic" repairs to compensate for effects of 7th nerve loss
tumor regrowth, monitored for a few years then surgically removed @ age 38 (of my choice, not medically necessary yet)

Sheryl

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Re: General anesthesia
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2007, 06:35:04 pm »
I've had quite a few surgeries recently (breast cancer, knee surgery, mediport placement and removal for my chemo) and I would always wake up vomiting - nice to look forward to  ???  I spoke with my brother who is an anesthesiologist and procurred a list of the drugs given to me for each of the surgeries and the one that popped out was "Fentanyl".  Before the last surgery (mediport removal), I spoke with the anesthesiologist and told him of my finding and concern.  He said he did not have to use Fentanyl and lo and behold I woke up ready for a seven-course dinner!!  It pays to do your research and speak up.
9th cranial nerve schwannoma - like an acoustic neuroma on another nerve. Have recently been told it could be acoustic neuroma. Only 7 mm of growth in 18 years. With no symptoms. Continuing W&W

jerseygirl

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Re: General anesthesia
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2007, 07:36:31 pm »
Thanks for your answers, everybody. I will be sure to ask what they use during general anesthesia when my surgery time comes.

    Eve
Right side AN (6x3x3 cm) removed in 1988 by Drs. Benjamin & Cohen at NYU (16 hrs); nerves involved III - XII.
Regrowth at the brainstem 2.5 cm removed by Dr.Shahinian in 4 hrs at SBI (hopefully, this time forever); nerves involved IV - X with VIII missing. No facial or swallowing issues.