Author Topic: Returning to work?  (Read 5684 times)

jaqiday

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 41
Returning to work?
« on: September 29, 2015, 07:01:40 pm »
Its been 6 months since I had my an removed via retrosig. I have facial paralysis that has improved recently but I still am dealing with dry eye and my mouth not working fully. I am getting a scleral lens next week to help with the dry eye.  I am still feeling unstable when I am out and about. I can drive a short distance but not at night because of eye ointment. I am hoping this resolves with the lens. 

My concern is how wobbly I still feel. My Neuro has been approving disability but said its a long time to go 6 months. I really don't feel I can work full time. I lost my job right after surgery and have to go through finding a new one. I don't feel I can commit to working full time to any prospective employer much less commute to and from work. I feel like a snail in traffic and its very unsettling.

Has anyone else been through any of this?  I am 58 and cannot fully retire for 10 more years. What to do?
Right AN 3.2cm 2-27-15
Retrosigmoid 3-9-15 6 hours
Facial nerve paralysis, dry eye, balance problems
Finding a new normal...

Jill Marie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 554
Re: Returning to work?
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2015, 11:48:28 pm »
I can't imagine trying to go back to work after just 6 months with your eye and balance issues.  Luckily I didn't have to work, had planned to work part time as the boys were in school but the tumor changed my plans.  I got a part time job 3 years after my surgery which turned full time a couple of years later.  I still had the non smiling & eye ointment issues but got the job anyway and have been there for 20 years now. 

It takes time for your body to adjust to all the changes and for you to conquer your fears.  I often find that my mind holds me back, if I think I can't I can't, if I push forward I can do it.  I was forced to get a job because my husband's company went on strike, there was no bus route near my new job so I was forced to drive.  In hindsight I'm really glad I was forced back into work and driving.  If you don't have to work I would recommend waiting a bit longer, if you have to work for financial reasons I can only recommend driving more to get more comfortable and confident. 

I hope all goes well with the scleral lens, I was on vacation and now our youngest is home on leave so haven't been posting.  Will read the many posts on the lens and post soon.  Take Care, Jill  :)
Facial Nerve Neuroma removed 6/15/92 by Dr. Charles Mangham, Seattle Ear Clinic. Deaf/left ear, left eye doesn't water.

alabamajane

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 629
Re: Returning to work?
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2015, 08:56:02 pm »
I'm sorry you are having to go through all of this.
I don't really agree that 6 months is time enough for you to be back on your feet to the extent you were before surgery. Especially with facial paralysis and eye issues. It takes a lot more energy for you to do daily activities when your brain is recovering and having to adjust to the paralysis, imbalance, lack of good eyesight just to name a few "issues"...

I too did not have to go back to work, nor could I have health wise, as I am retired. But I do know I felt much the same way you do while driving. It will take you time to really feel comfortable again but it will come with just doing it slowly.

Good luck with job search. Maybe your Dr will give you till after first of the year if you can wait that long to go back. It will do you good to adjust longer and just concentrate on healing.

Jane
translab Oct 27, 2011
facial nerve graft Oct 31,2011, eyelid weight removed Oct 2013, eye closes well

BAHA surgery Oct. 2014, activated Dec. 26

Kerrybr92

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 52
Re: Returning to work?
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2015, 07:31:26 pm »
I have been through this.  I am an accountant and needed desperately to return to work in time for tax season.  I had my surgery in November and tire turned to work in the middle of January.  On the surface  that sounds like a great recovery but really it was not.  I literally went to work at 8 am came home at 5pm, ate dinner right away and then went to sleep.  I would only shower every other night because showers did not sit well with me.  It was a terrible tax season.  I did not have energy to do anything else. I had to have lube in my eye since I did not have my lens yet.  My balance was terrible was clinging to the walls at work.  Also I had trouble speaking due to the facial paralysis so I needed to tell each client about the issue.

But I did it.  I would not recommend it.  It did prove to me that I had more in me than I thought.  So I bet you can do more than you think too.  But I hope you do not have to right away.  I would talk to the doctor though to see if you can get it extended.

Good luck and hang in there.

Kerry
Right AN 2.5cm
11/11/11 retrosigmoid surgery Drs. Barker and Mckenna MGH 16 hours
Right SSD, Right sclerel lens from Boston Foundation for Sight
Some facial weakness

Doc

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 376
  • “Shake off the BooHoo and get with the program”
Re: Returning to work?
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2015, 08:33:03 pm »
I’ll preface my input by first acknowledging we’re all different: My experience was similar to Kerry’s. I was released after my three week hospital stay on Monday and went back to work on Wednesday, and never looked back. I bet you a pack of gum if you went back to work, you would feel much better about things generally.
 
Still got the “Wonky Head” after six plus years.

Doc
« Last Edit: October 26, 2015, 12:55:09 pm by Doc B. »
Left-Translab July '09. Cyberknife Jan 2010. In Apr 2017, four more tumors found; three in the brain and one, 7cm long, on my spinal cord; it was surgically removed. It was cancerous, and so are the others. I've been receiving Chemo since June '18, and I'm still in treatment.

jaqiday

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 41
Re: Returning to work?
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2015, 10:13:14 am »
So I thought I should post a follow up to this.
My Neuro gave me more time of thru to Dec and I see him later this week. (oct 28). He did comment it is a long time off.  I am now going into the 9th month post op. I got a scleral lens so now I can actually see. This is huge as I can now drive day and night. I have made a few long road trips and made it through being out and about all day and didn't get too fatigued. My balance is still a bit off but I am having more almost normal days.
My tinnitus is still annoying, but so be it. Just have to live with it. Might consider hearing aids for the ssd later. For now just learning to live around it.
My face is still not moving but looks almost normal. Right around the 7 month mark it started to stop drooping. Most people don't notice at all except I am talking out of one side of my mouth. I feel movement is slowly returning.
I still have days that I get headaches and feel a bit off but they are fewer and fewer.
I will see how the next month goes and am thinking of returning to work in January.
True we are all different, It would be nice if the drs were more aware of that.
Thank you all for your comments.
Right AN 3.2cm 2-27-15
Retrosigmoid 3-9-15 6 hours
Facial nerve paralysis, dry eye, balance problems
Finding a new normal...

wintersmd

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 18
Re: Returning to work?
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2016, 05:53:40 pm »
I had my an removed in June 2013.  I was off work for about 2 months, and went back part time in Sept.  It took only a month to realize that I could no longer be efficient at my position in the Army, so I decided to retire.  2 1/2 years later I still have the "wonky head", cant drive at night, and get tired in the afternoon.  I find myself having to really focus on walking without stumbling, and keeping my balance when I stand up.  I am able to run with the wonky head, but it has taken some practice.  I will say that there are days that my balance is better than others.  I figure that it has been over 2 years so any progress is a benefit. 

My advice is to take as long as you can to heal.  This type of surgery needs time, and your body needs time to adjust.  I wish I would have taken more time prior to going back to work, even though it was part time.  Good luck to you.