Author Topic: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy  (Read 7811 times)

Palace

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Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy
« on: December 16, 2013, 12:11:42 pm »
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a form of encephalopathy that is a progressive degenerative disease, which can only be definitively diagnosed postmortem, in individuals with a history of multiple concussions and other forms of head injury. The disease was previously called dementia pugilistica (DP), as it was initially found in those with a history of boxing. CTE has been most commonly found in professional athletes participating in American football, ice hockey, professional wrestling and other contact sports who have experienced repetitive brain trauma. It has also been found in soldiers exposed to a blast or a concussive injury,[1] in both cases resulting in characteristic degeneration of brain tissue and the accumulation of tau protein. Individuals with CTE may show symptoms of dementia, such as memory loss, aggression, confusion and depression, which generally appear years or many decades after the trauma.

Repeated concussions and injuries less serious than concussions ("sub-concussions") incurred during the play of contact sports over a long period can result in CTE. In the case of blast injury, a single exposure to a blast and the subsequent violent movement of the head in the blast wind can cause the condition.

This is an interesting brain information that I just wanted to share.



Palace
22 mm Acoustic Neuroma (right side)
Cyberknife, Nov. & Dec. 2006
Dr. Iris Gibbs & Dr. Blevins @ Stanford
single sided deafness

jak1

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Re: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy
« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2013, 03:34:34 pm »
Have you ever experienced a physical head trauma?
2.7cm AN diagnosed 4/11.  Stanford CK 5/11.

terisandler

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Re: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2013, 07:08:46 pm »
Palace, you aren't implying that ANs are related to CTE, are you? 
3/25/13- dx 18x11x14 mm AN, hearing loss in right ear x 5+ years, 5 sessions of CK completed May 2013, now a "post toastie".  Follow up MRI 4/14/14 - 15x19x11 mm. Stable with some signs of necrosis.
 Yippee!

leapyrtwins

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Re: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2013, 03:56:16 pm »
You're scaring me here, Palace  :o

Are you implying that those w/ANs should be concerned with this?

I, for one, hope not!

Jan
Retrosig 5/31/07 Drs. Battista & Kazan (Hinsdale, Illinois)
Left AN 3.0 cm (1.5 cm @ diagnosis 6 wks prior) SSD. BAHA implant 3/4/08 (Dr. Battista) Divino 6/4/08  BP100 4/2010 BAHA 5 8/2015

I don't actually "make" trouble..just kind of attract it, fine tune it, and apply it in new and exciting ways

Jim Scott

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Re: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2013, 04:10:47 pm »
Palace ~ 

This is, indeed, interesting information but I don't believe that the skull surgery many AN patients undergo can be equated to the kind of head trauma that boxers, football players and blast victims suffer.  There may be a tangential resemblance to CTE symptoms in some post-surgical AN patients but the surgery, invasive as it is, doesn't equal a hard blow to the skull that can precipitate CTE.  However, I'm not a physician and my observation could be mistaken.

Jim   
4.5 cm AN diagnosed 5/06.  Retrosigmoid surgery 6/06.  Follow-up FSR completed 10/06.  Tumor shrinkage & necrosis noted on last MRI.  Life is good. 

Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is.  The way we cope with it is what makes the difference.

Palace

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Re: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2013, 01:03:05 pm »
jak1:  To answer that yes, by my father.

terisandler: No, I was not implying that an AN is related to CTE.  (just that I study brain data and share)

Jan:  You know me by now, Jan---in the medical-field and alway looking for new studies and data.  ;-)

Please feel free to share any brain information as, with all of us we never know what we might discover.


Thanks,  Pal
22 mm Acoustic Neuroma (right side)
Cyberknife, Nov. & Dec. 2006
Dr. Iris Gibbs & Dr. Blevins @ Stanford
single sided deafness

KerriLynAngel

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Re: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2014, 05:56:20 am »
Afraid I may have cte now. Had gamma to kill trigeminal in jan. Had the last molar which was infected exrtacted last wed in prep forr jaw reconstuct. Dont bleed enough from that side. Got dry socket. Have noticed over last year slow decline of cognitive function and emotional control.but now so bad. Pain dizzy weak. Talked to doc said may be gonna call me today but when I looked it up it really scared me! Sounds just like whats going on. Probably go to hospital today. So scared. Makes me think I shouldnt have everr had original surgery. I cant survive if I turn into a spit dribbling idiot. And why is it that only we, the weak and compromised, have to j I'mump thru hoops to find out things.?