Author Topic: post-op hospital discharge expectations  (Read 2271 times)

4cm in Pacific Northwest

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1324
post-op hospital discharge expectations
« on: October 18, 2007, 07:57:55 pm »
Hi all,

I am noticing that there have been a few inquiries (posts) from newbie’s about what to expect after surgery… coming from people as far away as Britain and Australia. Ranging from meds, to CSF leaks to facial physical therapy etc..

Here is a good link I found on post-op  hospital discharge expectations put out by the Acoustic Neuroma Association of Canada

http://www.anac.ca/en/dischargeTreatment.shtml

Hope someone out there in our AN family finds this helpful.

Cheers,

4
4cm Left, 08/22/07 R/S 11+ hr surgery Stanford U, Dr. Robert Jackler, Dr. Griffith Harsh, Canadian fellow Assist. Dr. Sumit Agrawal. SSD, 3/6 on HB facial scale, stick-on-eyeweight worked, 95% eye function@ 6 months. In neuromuscular facial retraining. Balance regained! Recent MRI -tumor receded!

cheza

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 116
  • I must be strong, this thing is beating me
    • facebook
Re: post-op hospital discharge expectations
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2007, 09:49:23 am »


Thank you this has been really helpful, also reason I'm on this site is because there isn't anything like this for the U.K infact the BANA (british acoustic neuroma assosiation) mambership has to be paid for £18.00  Per ann or £180.00 for lifetime membership I think if you've just been diagnosed it would be nice to talk to someone without having to pay first.
diagnosed 4th Oct 07 with a 3cm left acoustic neuroma,
surgery 9th Nov 07, age 30 at time of surgery,
total hearing loss to left ear, grade 6 facial palsay (getting better)
latest MRI shows regrowth on facial nerve.

4cm in Pacific Northwest

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1324
Re: post-op hospital discharge expectations
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2007, 03:42:18 pm »
USA has freedoms that many citizens here take for granted. Unlike Britain and New Zealand we don’t have to pay by-the-minute for local phone calls. However there are many underinsured or uninsured people deprived of good healthcare here (if their employer does not offer a good health benefit package.) Too many children with poor healthcare coverage. Canada has waiting lists for MRI’s that are just ridiculous… and frustrated (with the system) physicians are packing up and moving down here for better working conditions.

I wish I knew the answer…

I also appreciate the freedom of speech here ... and the ongoing sharing of information here in the USA. Fortunately the WWW has opened the information up to anyone who can log on.

No place is perfect ... but I am glad you have joined us here in the AN family.

You are not the only member residing in Britain, on the forum, joining the ANA ship for your journey.

Welcome. :)

4
4cm Left, 08/22/07 R/S 11+ hr surgery Stanford U, Dr. Robert Jackler, Dr. Griffith Harsh, Canadian fellow Assist. Dr. Sumit Agrawal. SSD, 3/6 on HB facial scale, stick-on-eyeweight worked, 95% eye function@ 6 months. In neuromuscular facial retraining. Balance regained! Recent MRI -tumor receded!

cheza

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 116
  • I must be strong, this thing is beating me
    • facebook
Re: post-op hospital discharge expectations
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2007, 06:25:25 am »

I guess I should count myself lucky, the NHS (National health service) is a god send and available to everyone but we do pay towards it along with our tax its called national insurance, and everyone who is employed pays contributions, I just get annoyed when there are those who decide working isn't for them, then reep all the benifet off the state which I'm paying for Grrrrr really gets my goat

Well thats my moan for the day

Thanks cheryl.
diagnosed 4th Oct 07 with a 3cm left acoustic neuroma,
surgery 9th Nov 07, age 30 at time of surgery,
total hearing loss to left ear, grade 6 facial palsay (getting better)
latest MRI shows regrowth on facial nerve.

4cm in Pacific Northwest

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1324
Re: post-op hospital discharge expectations
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2007, 09:41:29 am »
Yes there are many that abuse >:(  the system   ... hurting everyone when they do.

In Canada I never saw one medical bill. Many Canadians are oblivious  to the costs involved. Here in the USA I saw my first medical bill and realized how much   :o my insurance company was billed and for what. Perhaps if Canadians at least saw the bill (they are so  ::)  oblivious too) ... then there may be less abuse of the system there.

Here in the USA I am appalled  :o to read that one AN forum’ers who was left with facial palsy is going to ‘second mortgage’ her house to get this done.
http://www.hopkinsfacialplastics.com/gallery_facial_reanimation.php
Being that the facial palsy was a result of needed brain surgery – it is amazing to me that this is not covered by her insurance. Some view this as “cosmetic surgery�. :(

 Some people here have to leave their jobs as their occupation can be too demanding with the presence of their new disability (SSD, fatigue, headaches- however not all have residual disabilities) yet they do not qualify for disability pension. Once they leave their employer- they have no health insurance. Some AN patients are pressured to go back to their jobs way to soon – and having to work in conditions and longer hours than they should. Often they take various steroids and painkillers to get through the day –when really they should be resting and listening to their bodies. This prolongs and sometimes inhibits their full recovery.

Disability pensions and insurance should be available for people who really do need it. Some families actually loose their homes here due to the main income earner becoming disabled – it happens …They cannot pay their medical expenses (or mortgage)  and/or they can no longer maintain the job that brought in their income. Once they leave the job – their medical benefits seize. Some families are devastated… and their stability destroyed. Sure some survive the crises due to the fundraising efforts of generous friends, families or churches who rally financial support on their behalf… but one too many do not.

Both socialized and privatized healthcare have their issues. There is no one solution – however I wish there was.

Like I said before, “No place is perfect�

Give people information to make good choices (in medical care, at the voting polls, selecting leaders) is the best one can do. Hopefully the link I posted will help someone make good choices as they recover. I know it provided me with more information that I was given at discharge … I am thankful, daily, that I had good insurance, top notch doctors… and that I can stay at home and rest as needed. (Not all have this) I doubt I will go back to my original occupation and I will have to make a vocational change of some sort- in my future. In Canada people can get funding to retrain (or go back to school) as mature adults- here this is not the case.

Currently I have to focus on just getting well… later I will figure out the “back to school� mid-life journey… On Nov 9th you will be in my thoughts and prayers- that there in Britain you will be in exceptionally good hands. I hope you will keep us all updated during your recovery.

Cheers,

4
4cm Left, 08/22/07 R/S 11+ hr surgery Stanford U, Dr. Robert Jackler, Dr. Griffith Harsh, Canadian fellow Assist. Dr. Sumit Agrawal. SSD, 3/6 on HB facial scale, stick-on-eyeweight worked, 95% eye function@ 6 months. In neuromuscular facial retraining. Balance regained! Recent MRI -tumor receded!

 


anything