Author Topic: "Sign Language"  (Read 3851 times)

Palace

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"Sign Language"
« on: April 25, 2008, 09:39:22 am »
Hello Friends,


If there are people on the list that have experience in SL, please let us know more about it.

I hope to incorporate the learning of ASL in my day.  Perhaps, it can help bring a family together, rather than apart---during a crisis it could be a learning experience that we can benefit from and share with appropriate relatives.

Thank you for any insight on this subject.  I wanted to start this in a "special topic" to elaborate on it.



Blessings and greeting to all of you,



Palace


« Last Edit: April 28, 2008, 12:19:09 am by Palace »
22 mm Acoustic Neuroma (right side)
Cyberknife, Nov. & Dec. 2006
Dr. Iris Gibbs & Dr. Blevins @ Stanford
single sided deafness

Palace

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Re: "Sign Language"
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2008, 09:47:46 am »
Hi


I saw a concert that someone from the audience was "signing" the lyrics.  The lady was invited on the stage to "sign" along while the band was playing.  It was a reminder of the "light" and "gift" of gold in some circumstances.



Pal
« Last Edit: April 25, 2008, 09:52:11 pm by Palace »
22 mm Acoustic Neuroma (right side)
Cyberknife, Nov. & Dec. 2006
Dr. Iris Gibbs & Dr. Blevins @ Stanford
single sided deafness

jerseygirl

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Re: "Sign Language"
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2008, 09:51:30 am »
Palace,

Lori67 is taking ASL, you might ask her how it is. I am interested in it myself.

                          Eve

Right side AN (6x3x3 cm) removed in 1988 by Drs. Benjamin & Cohen at NYU (16 hrs); nerves involved III - XII.
Regrowth at the brainstem 2.5 cm removed by Dr.Shahinian in 4 hrs at SBI (hopefully, this time forever); nerves involved IV - X with VIII missing. No facial or swallowing issues.

lori67

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Re: "Sign Language"
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2008, 11:58:17 am »
Well, I am really enjoying learning ASL.  I'd tried to learn before from a book, but never had any luck.  People are 3D and books are not, so it's hard to get the signs right unless you really see what they look like. 

I've had the most luck taking a class and learning from an ASL interpreter.  If that isn't an option, I'd suggest a video or an on-line course with an animated dictionary, so you can see what the signs look like.  Stay away from anything that says "Signed Exact English".  It's more complicated and no one uses it anymore anyway.

Check with your library and see if they offer classes.  Sometimes churches offer them too.  Otherwise, you can probably do what I did and just enter "Deaf services" or "ASL classes" and your city in your computer browser and you'll probably get a lot of hits that way.

When we move back to Virginia next year, I plan on seeing if the Navy will pay for me to go back to school to get a degree in ASL interpreting.  The job market looks good for that field and the pay is better than working as a nurse or a PT, that's for sure.  (and no sick people - yay!).

I think you should check it out.  It'e been rewarding for me and I usually like to try to find the silver lining in the black clouds that seem to follow me around sometimes, so I guess this is the lining in the black could of SSD.  Someday it might be helpful to someone other than myself. 

Besides, after being a stay-at-home Mom for 5 years, it feels good to have to use my brain for something other than remembering the names of the Muppets.

Check out www.aslpro.com/cgi-bin/aslpro/aslpro

Lori
Right 3cm AN diagnosed 1/2007.  Translab resection 2/20/07 by Dr. David Kaylie and Dr. Karl Hampf at Baptist Hospital in Nashville.  R side deafness, facial nerve paralysis.  Tarsorraphy and tear duct cauterization 5/2007.  BAHA implant 11/8/07. 7-12 nerve jump 9/26/08.

Syl

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Re: "Sign Language"
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2008, 02:45:28 pm »
I took 2 semesters of sign language some 10 years ago. My interest in the subject was brought on by a Deaf neighbor. Later on I was able to practice it with a Deaf co-worker.

I haven't practiced it for some years now, and have gotten rusty. But now with this AN in my life and SSD in my very near future, I think that I should hone my ASL skills again.

Syl
1.5cm AN rt side; Retrosig June 16, 2008; preserved facial and hearing nerves;
FINALLY FREE OF CHRONIC HEADACHES 4.5 years post-op!!!!!!!
Drs. Kato, Blumenfeld, and Cheung.

Pembo

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Re: "Sign Language"
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2008, 11:27:59 am »
I'm taking a class in ASL right now. Our teacher was born deaf and has very little speech. It is very mentally challenging but I enjoy it.
Surgery June 3, 2004, University Hospitals Cleveland, BAHA received in 2005, Facial Therapy at UPMC 2006

matti

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Re: "Sign Language"
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2008, 10:51:29 pm »
I was very happy to see that many colleges have added ASL as an alternative to taking a foreign language. Because of my hearing disability, my son had decided to take ASL and is in his 3rd year with it. I've been able to learn quite a bit through him. I was asked to visit his class a while back and gave a talk on my AN journey and how single sided deafness has impacted my life and those close to me.


Cheryl

3.5 cm  - left side  Single sided deafness 
Middle Fossa Approach - California Ear Institute at Stanford - July 1998
Dr. Joseph Roberson and Dr. Gary Steinberg
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Sue

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Re: "Sign Language"
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2008, 01:06:35 am »
I took a short ASL class years ago when we lived in a small coastal community.  A mother of a deaf child gave the classes to anyone who wanted to take them.  It was fun, but like any foreign language it takes practice, practice, practice.  I only remember a few things, now.  Some of the alphabet and thank you, and mother and father.  I agree, it would be easier to have somebody show you how to do it.  This is a great skill to have, even if you aren't hard of hearing.  A lot of community colleges have ASL classes.  I worked briefly with a young gal that had taken 2 years of it in high school.  She was very good.  If you have seen actress Marilee Matlin do her signing, you can see how fast it can be...and that takes a lot of practice to get to that point.  My brain and my fingers won't co-operate like that! 

Good luck!

Sue in Vancouver, USA
Sue in Vancouver, USA
 2 cm Left side
Diagnosed 3/13/06 GK 4-18-06
Gamma Knife Center of Oregon
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Palace

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Re: "Sign Language"
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2008, 02:51:42 pm »
Dear Forum Members:

Marlee Matlin became deaf at the age of 18 months due to a bout with Roseola Infantum. That didn't stop her, though, from acting in a children's theatre company at age 7; she was Dorothy in "The Wizard of Oz." Her deafness never held her back. As an adult she said it so eloquently: "I have always resisted putting limitations on myself, both professionally and personally." Marlee studied Criminal Justice at Harper College in Palatine, Illinois, and maintained her passion for acting after graduating.

This is much to be admired.  As for me---I'm using the, Random House Webster's Concise American Sign Language Dictionary, Elaine Costello, Ph.D.  Barron's ASL (second edition)  "The Easy Way," is helpful because, it's a large book with clear illistrations. 

My DVD came today.  Sign Language for Everyone: "How to Talk to a Person Who Can't Hear."  (starring Anthony Natale)

I realize that this takes much practice and dedication.

Thank you everyone for your information and support......



Regards,



Palace
« Last Edit: April 28, 2008, 02:56:25 pm by Palace »
22 mm Acoustic Neuroma (right side)
Cyberknife, Nov. & Dec. 2006
Dr. Iris Gibbs & Dr. Blevins @ Stanford
single sided deafness

chocolatetruffle

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Re: "Sign Language"
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2008, 08:51:05 pm »
this post is not about sign language but lipreading - i have been trying to find lipreading classes in my area with no luck! and the classes i managed to find are held during the day, and I work.  anyone got any suggestions? i live in the bay area, california.  thanks!
chocolatetruffle


2.8 cm left AN
Translab @ House/St Vincent's 11/27/07
Drs. Brackmann, Schwartz, Wilkinson, Stefan

Palace

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Re: "Sign Language"
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2008, 09:29:50 pm »
Chocolatetruffle,


I hope this is what you might be looking for:

Come to this 8-week class to learn how to maximize communication through lipreading, stress reduction, creative problem solving and assertiveness. Instruction is taught in a supportive group environment .

Hearing and Speech Center of Northern California

When: Fridays

Time: 10:00 – 12:00

NOTE: THE LIPREADING CLASS DOES NOT MEET IN JUNE, JULY, AND MOST OF AUGUST. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN ATTENDING THE CLASS IN AUGUST, PLEASE SEND AN EMAIL TO INFO@HEARINGSPEECH.ORG
22 mm Acoustic Neuroma (right side)
Cyberknife, Nov. & Dec. 2006
Dr. Iris Gibbs & Dr. Blevins @ Stanford
single sided deafness

Palace

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Re: "Sign Language"
« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2008, 10:34:12 am »
Hi Everyone,


I'll call around and see if I can find any group, class or maybe someone I can "sign" with personally.  I'm up in the mountains and it's far to drive for any activity.

Pembo sent me a personal message about her experience with "signing."  I'm very appreciative to find out anymore information I might need to pursue this new adventure.

Here is a thought---I had personal classes ("one on one") with each of my littermate dogs.  We took private lessons and learned the sign language to use for showing dogs in obedience.  My one female gal had a juvinile cataract so, I dropped her "sign language" and went with vocal commands.  I could show her in obedience since she didn't pass her clearance.  She didn't qualify as "Standard" however, the male littermate could have been shown for his measurements and beauty.  The female dog looked very "field-bred," and she is much smaller.  Both dogs learned commands quickly and so can we.  They pay attention for the treat award, at first. 

Treat yourself to something special in the beginning, if that is what it takes---just to get you motivated and started in signing.  Starting is the most difficult part.  I need encouragement as, my schedule is full, already.  (some reward to make more time in the day)

Please feel free to post anymore ideas or information on signing; I hope more people will at least, try it.



Thank you,



Palace
« Last Edit: April 30, 2008, 10:44:22 am by Palace »
22 mm Acoustic Neuroma (right side)
Cyberknife, Nov. & Dec. 2006
Dr. Iris Gibbs & Dr. Blevins @ Stanford
single sided deafness

Palace

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Re: "Sign Language"
« Reply #12 on: May 04, 2008, 01:44:32 pm »
Chocolatetruffle and other No. Cal. Folks,


Mo Moscovitz does ASL when the bands play at the Santa Cruz Boardwalk.  If you are interested and/or plan a little vacation, you might enjoy watching him "signing" the lyrics.  He is the ASL instructor for a couple of our local colleges.  The bands will begin their show at 6:30 and 8:30 PM, starting June 20, 2008. 

Santa Cruz, CA. is a tourist-town with plenty to do in nearby Capitola.

Matti/Cheryl, a No. CA. gal on this forum, might also be interested in seeing Mo. "signing." 

I'm just beginning with this adventure however, enjoying every "sign."

If you're interested, call your local Senior Center and perhaps they might know people who use ASL.  (who you might practice with once, you learn "signing," correctly; practice and more practice)

Make it fun so you keep up with it......



Palace
« Last Edit: May 04, 2008, 01:50:25 pm by Palace »
22 mm Acoustic Neuroma (right side)
Cyberknife, Nov. & Dec. 2006
Dr. Iris Gibbs & Dr. Blevins @ Stanford
single sided deafness

 


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