Author Topic: Question for THose Survivors Still Suffering From Balance Issues  (Read 838 times)

paulinrio

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I had my translab surgery in July 2013 and now, almost 5 years later, I still suffering ,daily ,from balance issues. I am investigating alternative approaches, as I am tired of the effects that this dizziness has on my quality of life. I am considering experimenting with KAMBO, a Brazilian  treatment , using  venom from a Amazonian frog. Has anyone tried this? If so, what were the results? Thank you and good health, Paul Wasserman

gunns

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Re: Question for THose Survivors Still Suffering From Balance Issues
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2018, 12:43:33 am »
I don’t know man?  I googled “Kambo” and for me it’s non-starter. I don’t want to go down that path. But to each their own.  If you decide to go ahead with the Kambo I wish you luck.

Patti

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Re: Question for THose Survivors Still Suffering From Balance Issues
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2018, 04:14:11 am »
I'm not a doctor, but i'm pretty sure you have to actively re-train your brain and I believe we need to do it for life.  I had physical therapy for 6 months after a 2month re-hab stay. since then i have made exercise my priority.  balance is still an issue but i can't imagine where i'd be if i wasn't so physical. i started with walking, then yoga, then HIIT (high intensity interval training). i still appear drunk when i am tired.  so i guess there is never total healing for me.  i do have to say, i do not suffer from dizziness as you do.
4 cm AN removed 12/2000
subsequent brain swelling
removal of part of cerebellum
face, scalp,tongue numbness and partial paralysis
no corneal sensation and no tears-frequent eye issues
cognitive issues
Regrowth (3.1 x ..86 cm) treated by SRS on November 6, 2015

Tdenmo

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Re: Question for THose Survivors Still Suffering From Balance Issues
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2018, 08:32:48 pm »
You don't really mention whether you've tried any other more conventional approaches, like for instance regular vestibular therapy! There are people who specialize in this, and you can ask your physician to refer you, or do some investigative work to find someone. Just like with any type of rehab, they can assess where you are and determine how to help you improve and can give you exercises to do at home and measure your progress. Much like you have to strengthen a broken bone, you have to re-train your brain. It probably won't be as good as new, but there are probably some ways that you can improve prior to resorting to something so unconventional.