Author Topic: Decompensation?  (Read 686 times)

gunns

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Decompensation?
« on: April 19, 2018, 08:05:18 am »
I had my tumor removed July 2017.  I felt that I was doing really well with recovery. Had problems with AN side eye not closing completely and staying shut at night. Also a little sagging of face. Both cleared up on their own in a few weeks. Balance was coming right along. I did a fair amount of walking. I would start of with my cane and balance would improve as I walked to the point that I’d just carry it. I’ve been very active with heavy property maintenance and heavy weight training. I’m several months post-op now but starting a couple months ago things took a turn. The wonky head monster has taken a liking to me again. It’s as bad or worse than just after surgery. I’m falling without any warning - 3 times in the last month. All occurred while just walking slowly. All this came back when I was starting to get my motorcycle ready to ride again. Now that’s on the back burner. I turn 70 this summer and don’t have time for this.

I’ve heard people talk about “decompensation”. Can someone explain it?

Forgot to mention all 3 falls occurred while walking and turning to the left, my AN side.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2018, 08:12:18 am by gunns »

gunns

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Re: Decompensation?
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2018, 03:17:16 pm »
I was able to answer my own question. I couldnt find any answers on this site so I googled it.  Apparently your brain does a brain dump on all the progress you've made concerning how your brain has been able to "compensate" for the loss of your vedtibular nerves that were cut during surgery. I guess you end up going back to square one just after surgery.  I don't know if it also causes a cerebral clamp as well that you will need to get past to re-compensate for balance loss. As I understand the decompensation issue can reoccur in the future. It apparently foesnt take much to set it off- a cold, change inn your normal daily pattern such as going on a vacation were some of the listed triggers.

notaclone13

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Re: Decompensation?
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2018, 05:33:25 pm »
Sorry you are going through this problem.  I would hate falling over all of a sudden.  So disapointing after all the progress you have made thus far.  Hope you get over this issue soon.  Did you call your doctor to get his take on it? 

gunns

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Re: Decompensation?
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2018, 07:21:33 pm »
Hadn’t called yet.  I’ve got other pressing issues to deal with first.  I will next week. Ya know ya put one fire out and to more start. LOL!! The good thing is I can’t die for several more years as I have too much work to get done. This thing just gave me another extension on life. Just a little dark humor thrown in for fun. LOL

gunns

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Re: Decompensation?
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2018, 10:58:22 pm »
I am concerned about telling my doctor for fear of him being required to notifying the Dept of Motor Vehicles and them pulling my drivers license.

Kathleen_Mc

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Re: Decompensation?
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2018, 02:26:26 am »
That is a concern but you really should contact your doctor.
At one point I had a seizure, I never had my license pulled, I made a promise to my doctor about driving or not and what he sent in just made it that I had to submit a report to the ministry every 6 months for two years. ( it is believed the seizure was cause by combining a medication with alcohol and the brain recovering from the surgery and highly unlikely to reoccur).
Kathleen
1st AN surgery @ age 23, 16 hours
Loss of 7-10th nerves
mulitple "plastic" repairs to compensate for effects of 7th nerve loss
tumor regrowth, monitored for a few years then surgically removed @ age 38 (of my choice, not medically necessary yet)

 


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