Author Topic: Re: Social Security Disability  (Read 6679 times)

ewhitese

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Re: Social Security Disability
« on: December 22, 2013, 08:41:18 pm »
I am a newby just did Gama Knife in august. I am a 31 year veteran school teacher 54 years old.  My last treatment was the day before classes started in august.  I am 4 months out and find myself feeling out of control in my work place for the first time in my life.  I am struggling to keep up the last couple of weeks and am thankful for the Christmas break.  I have been contemplating an early retirement and wondering about SSDI. I didn't consider any cognitive effects in my decision to Gama Knife and am just now realizing that they exist.  The combination of tinnitus, hearing loss and memory difficulties really snuck up on me. I didn't realize there would be this much impact.

As a SSDI recipient are you allowed to work part time or change employment with less pay, less stress and still collect a benefit?  I can't picture myself not working at something and would not want to be forced into stopping activity due to fear of loosing benefits.  I am close enough to take an early retirement but the medical insurance costs for the 10 years till medicare will take the lion share of my pension.  Pardon me if I am hijacking a topic, I am new to the forum world and not sure I am doing this correctly I apologize if I have offended.  I typically stay away from social media, it tends to be used as a club in my profession if deemed politically incorrect.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2013, 09:04:51 am by Jim Scott »

Jim Scott

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Re: Social Security Disability
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2013, 09:14:51 am »
Ewhitese ~

I slighted edited and moved your post into it's own thread to help it receive better attention than it would receive at the tail end of another thread.

My wife is an SSDI recipient (not AN related) and to the best of my knowledge, to qualify for SSDI you must not be able to work at any job due to your limitations.  Working a less-demanding job or even part time disqualifies you for benefits.  However, the best place to learn the exact rules to qualify for SSDI benefits is to look online: http://www.ssa.gov/pgm/disability.htm for information.

Jim
4.5 cm AN diagnosed 5/06.  Retrosigmoid surgery 6/06.  Follow-up FSR completed 10/06.  Tumor shrinkage & necrosis noted on last MRI.  Life is good. 

Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is.  The way we cope with it is what makes the difference.

Petrone

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Re: Social Security Disability
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2013, 09:38:29 pm »
Ewhitese,

Just a suggestion, but don't throw in the towel just yet.  I had GK this past April and I also experienced sharply increased dizziness and crushing headaches at about 3-4 months post-GK.  My symptoms lasted a good 2 months before gradually subsiding completely by September.  Granted, we all respond differently to these procedures, but I am now completely free of all post-GK side effects.  I am 52 and work in a very demanding profession.  I expect to work another 15-20 years because I enjoy being challenged and I think I have something to offer to my employer and our clients.  You might find others on this forum who share the temporary setbacks after GK, as well as the longer term recovery (Robin comes to mind, for example).  For many (not all), recovery has as much to do with having a positive attitude as it does to do with the adversity of side effects and temporary setbacks. 

(Maybe in addition to the Watch and Wait Brigade, it's time to start an "I refuse to let this #### tumor define or limit me, Brigade!")


Best wishes and Happy Holidays!

Petrone
1.4cm diagnosed 3/2010
W&W until 1.8cm by 10/2012
GK performed 4/17/2013 at Froedtert in WI
2 years after GK - 1.6cm
3 years after GK - 1.4cm

ewhitese

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Re: Social Security Disability
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2013, 04:53:56 pm »
I have been spending some time trolling this website since my original post, thanks to those who had the presence of mind to diary their experience as Robin and others have.  I do see in others the symptoms seem to generally subside over time.  My take away is don't be to hasty and throw in the towel to quickly.  I have powered through other illnesses I am determined to go as long as possible, as long as safety and job quality are not effected.  I appreciate the cander and have learned from others to identify what is happening to me.  Just being able to put a lable on the symptoms and understand that others are experiencing  and how they are dealing with them is a comfort and learning experience.  I scheduled an appointment for vestibular rehab on thursday, hope this helps with the dizzy/balance issues.

I am a (post toastie) thought that was a good descriptor, no I didn't name my tumor didn't name my smashed tooth either, but I do name my smashed finger nail, blackened in the line of duty, I call it my carpenters union card.  That's code for those in the trade for (ya we all get em and usually have at least one black nail all the time) just so you know that hurts GK surgery doesn't. 

I have been reading the insurance topics and see that medicare may be an issue in paying for some treatment or limiting the amount of treatment down the road.  I am concerned if I opt for SSDI I may lock myself out of insurance options currently available to me through my employer.  Thanks for the help Jim and the words of encouragement Petrone I appriciate the advice.  My goal going forward is to at least wait until I see 6 month MRI results the end of February before making any decisions.   I know this is a long haul kinda thing and should accept the time table that I have been handed could have been worse.

james e

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Re: Social Security Disability
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2014, 11:15:06 am »
If you get SSDI, you are enrolled into Medicare on your second anniversary, regardless of your age. It is not the real Medicare, but you will purchase an Advantage plan, which is a type of private Medicare. I am on that until July when I will be 65. Then I will be on the "real" Medicare. Medicare will be deducted from your SS check and you will pay for the advantage plan out of pocket. You can get that through your employer.

Recovery really is a long term issue, so be patient.

James

vegaslady

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Re: Social Security Disability
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2014, 11:47:09 pm »
This is my first post.  As to Medicare with SSDI...it is correct that it takes 2 years to be eligible for it.  However, it is regular Medicare.  If you want a Medicare Advantage plan that is a choice you can make when you become eligible, or during open enrollment which is towards the end of every calendar year.  Also, if you are on some else's health insurance and don't want to be paying yet for Medicare you can decline the Medicare and sign up for it later when you choose to.  You need to read the Medicare info, or even call them and ask about it.  My husband got SSDI well over a decade ago.  He declined Medicare (and the cost of it!) because I was still working and he was well covered under my health insurance.  Later on we both signed up for Medicare which is now our primary insurance.  I have also kept my health insurance which is Blue Cross.  Between the 2 we rarely pay for anything but prescriptions.

vegaslady

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Re: Social Security Disability
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2014, 11:59:19 pm »
When you get SSDI you are considered unable to work.  However, Social Security has a program to help disabled go back to some type of employment.  I think it's called Ticket to Work.  Go on the ssa.gov website and look for that.  It's complicated and we did not look into it much, but you can get help to try and work again.  There is a long period where you earn some money without being penalized. By the way, elsewhere I have seen others concerned about whether it's too expensive to get an attorney to file an appeal of an SSDI denial....they are limited by law to getting only 25% of your back benefits if you win.  Talk to an attorney who specializes in these and find out.