Author Topic: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thoughts?  (Read 17748 times)

Kaybo

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thought
« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2009, 07:36:55 am »
Following this with much interest...

;D
Translab 12/95@Houston Methodist(Baylor College of Medicine)for "HUGE" tumor-no size specified
25 yrs then-14 hour surgery-stroke
12/7 Graft 1/97
Gold Weight x 5
SSD
Facial Paralysis-R(no movement or feelings in face,mouth,eye)
T3-3/08
Great life!

amymeri

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thought
« Reply #16 on: September 25, 2009, 09:13:47 am »
Hi Everyone   :-X

I don't know which exact aid he tried.  It was just a general demonstrator that was a behind the ear type but he had it low volume.  The one he recommended was the Oticon Hit because it was inexpensive but had a strong enough amplifier to work.  He said it didn't have to be a fancy aid...a normal one would do, but just provide strong enough amplification to transmit the sound.  The one I am choosing is in-ear and is medium sized. 

I don't know if it would work if your cochlea is destroyed with a translab...that's a very interesting question.  When I see my audiologist in 2 weeks I will ask.

If anyone else has information when they question their own audiologists I would really love to hear other opinions. 

Thanks!!
Amy
Amy

4 cm right AN removed restrosigmoid 4/13/06
Partial facial paralysis, SSD and trigeminal numbness for now

alicia

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thoughts?
« Reply #17 on: September 25, 2009, 10:31:19 am »
I too am following this thread with a ton of interest!
02/16/18 III to IV post GK Facial Paralysis
12/13/17 Gamma Knife
05/19/09 Translab Larger than expected - Drs used the word "tangerine"   House - Friedman and Schwartz
04/02/09 Diagnosed Left AN 3.2cm x 2.6cm x 2.7cm

amymeri

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thought
« Reply #18 on: September 25, 2009, 10:37:03 am »
 :D Does that mean my head is hollow??

Let me know when you try it.  It is so interesting the differing opinions on the devices.

I didn't think the sound was distorted when I tried the tester.  Maybe not a clear as the BAHA (which reminded me of talking to someone on the telephone) but not distorted.  Apparently I have a light-n-hollow head!

I await your experience with bated breath!
« Last Edit: September 25, 2009, 10:38:57 am by amymeri »
Amy

4 cm right AN removed restrosigmoid 4/13/06
Partial facial paralysis, SSD and trigeminal numbness for now

amymeri

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thought
« Reply #19 on: September 25, 2009, 11:08:52 am »
Thanks, that's interesting.

Interestingly. my audiologist (and the research I have done) are very down on the CROS system!  Which just goes to show you.

The BAHA was superior, but I really hate the idea of the daily care, the surgery, all that...so I am going to try the aid and see what happens since I had good speech recognition with the tester.

VERY interesting.
Amy

4 cm right AN removed restrosigmoid 4/13/06
Partial facial paralysis, SSD and trigeminal numbness for now

alicia

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thoughts?
« Reply #20 on: September 25, 2009, 11:13:10 am »
Amy - I am very interested what you experience with the hearing aid.  I am one that was denied BAHA insurance coverage, so I am always looking for options.  Please update us after you use the aid for awhile!
02/16/18 III to IV post GK Facial Paralysis
12/13/17 Gamma Knife
05/19/09 Translab Larger than expected - Drs used the word "tangerine"   House - Friedman and Schwartz
04/02/09 Diagnosed Left AN 3.2cm x 2.6cm x 2.7cm

amymeri

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thought
« Reply #21 on: September 25, 2009, 11:30:04 am »
I sent all that information to my audiologist to get his take on the explanation you got at HEI. 

This is such an interesting topic!   ;)
Amy

4 cm right AN removed restrosigmoid 4/13/06
Partial facial paralysis, SSD and trigeminal numbness for now

amymeri

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thought
« Reply #22 on: September 25, 2009, 12:01:23 pm »
My audiologist just emailed back (in 15 minutes!) and gave a good explanation. I will post the entire, more complex, explanation if he gives me permission.
Meanwhile the upshot is...

The ability of your ears to pick up on sound coming into the other side is well known.  For instance, when they tested my hearing after the surgery I thought I could hear the tones in my deaf ear.  But in fact, I was actually hearing them in my good ear!  They had to use very loud white noise in my good ear to mask it so that testing in my deaf ear was accurate.  So I could hear those tiny tones going from deaf to good ear unless they blocked the  'inter-aural attenuation'.

His suggestion is to use that natural ability to my advantage and simply amplify the sound to make it easier and clearer.  He said the aid does have to fit well to prevent acoustic feedback but that since I am completely deaf in my right ear, louder sounds in that ear aren't painful or dangerous.

About the cochlea overdrive theory...he said that it would overdrive the bad cochlea but that didn't matter...I have nothing savable there.  They won't overdrive my good cochlea because it is set just so I can hear clearly, not loudly which doesn't overtax the hearing cochlea.

Whew.
Amy

4 cm right AN removed restrosigmoid 4/13/06
Partial facial paralysis, SSD and trigeminal numbness for now

Jim Scott

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thoughts?
« Reply #23 on: September 25, 2009, 12:11:07 pm »
Amy ~

I'm SSD and don't use a BAHA or any type of hearing aid - I just cope.  However, I'm well aware of my hearing deficit.  Like many others, I've been following this thread but didn't have much to add.  I still don't, except to mention that I look forward to learning how your new 'regular' hearing aid actually performs.  I hope it works well for you.

Jim
4.5 cm AN diagnosed 5/06.  Retrosigmoid surgery 6/06.  Follow-up FSR completed 10/06.  Tumor shrinkage & necrosis noted on last MRI.  Life is good. 

Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is.  The way we cope with it is what makes the difference.

amymeri

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thought
« Reply #24 on: September 25, 2009, 01:47:33 pm »
Okay, so here is my audiologists more complete reply (I got his permission to post) and a copy to a link he sent me.  This is from three conversations so it's chunked up a bit.

Amy
This concept isn't new as we in Audiology have had to deal with this effect as a 'complication' of hearing testing since the very beginning.  Every Audiologist knows that at a certain level sound will travel from one side of the head to the other.  The amount of sound that is absorbed on the way over is referred to as the 'inter-aural attenuation'.  When performing diagnostic hearing testing on people with SSD we deal with this in a couple of ways - by using masking noise in the non-test (better-hearing) ear or by using insert earphones rather than traditional headphones as they have more inter-aural attenuation.  If you don't account for this cross-over-effect it will appear as though the individual has a flat moderate hearing loss (when using traditional headphones) or a flat severe hearing loss (when using insert earphones) when in fact they have NO hearing at all in that ear.
My suggestion was to simply use this cross-over-effect to your advantage by providing stimulation from sounds on your poor-hearing side to your normal-hearing side.  Yes, the fit of the instrument needs to be good, but not because of bone-conduction but rather to prevent excessive acoustic feedback.  People with SSD tend to be good candidates for this approach because they receive no discomfort from the loud sound in their 'dead' ear.  Others who have some useable hearing in the bad ear will often report negative sensations from the amplified sound.  As we discussed previously, the BAHA/Trans-ear/CROS approach can offer slightly better high-frequency fidelity but the trans-cranial-CROS approach is much simpler and less invasive/unattractive....
Hope this helps.
(Name)

No, it won't overdrive/tax your good cochlea or VIIIth nerve because we set the hearing aid to provide only enough amplification to make the sounds just audible on the good side, not loud.  Are we overdriving the bad cochlea?  You bet, but it doesn't matter as that ear is 'off line' anyway.

No problem.  Again, there are several CROS options each with its strengths/limitations.  The trans-cranial CROS is not for everyone but it is definitely a viable option.

Here is a brief article written by one of our profession's experts (Dr. Gus):

http://www.audiologyonline.com/askexpert/display_question.asp?question_id=118

Amy

4 cm right AN removed restrosigmoid 4/13/06
Partial facial paralysis, SSD and trigeminal numbness for now

Kaybo

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thought
« Reply #25 on: September 25, 2009, 02:59:29 pm »
Amy~
You mentioned "daily care" of a BAHA - how is the care of a BAHA different than a regular hearing aid?  They both are put on & taken off daily and both require batteries...what else do the BAHA require?

K    ???
Translab 12/95@Houston Methodist(Baylor College of Medicine)for "HUGE" tumor-no size specified
25 yrs then-14 hour surgery-stroke
12/7 Graft 1/97
Gold Weight x 5
SSD
Facial Paralysis-R(no movement or feelings in face,mouth,eye)
T3-3/08
Great life!

amymeri

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thought
« Reply #26 on: September 25, 2009, 03:01:56 pm »
I meant the skin care.  I know it's not a big deal, but I am a worrier, so it would be a constant, tiny, worry...infection, irritation, etc.

Since I ride horses, I get hot, sweaty and dirty wearing a tight fitting helmet on a daily basis...it just seems like it would be easy to get infected under those circumstances.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2009, 03:17:21 pm by amymeri »
Amy

4 cm right AN removed restrosigmoid 4/13/06
Partial facial paralysis, SSD and trigeminal numbness for now

JerseyGirl2

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thought
« Reply #27 on: September 25, 2009, 03:21:22 pm »
I meant the skin care.

I think this must vary a great deal from person to person. I'm always surprised to read about people having any sort of infection, "redness," etc. at the site of their BAHA abutment -- I've never had a bit of trouble and find that I can maintain the area with nothing more complicated than my daily shampoo regimen. I think that even most of those folks who have an occasional issue find that any problems are easily taken care of with a bit of Neosporin or something similar.

I've worn my BAHA Intenso for almost a year and a half and I think of it as a "third contact lens" -- in my opinion, it's totally second nature and no big deal whatsoever!

Catherine (JerseyGirl2)
Translab surgery and BAHA implant: House Ear Institute, Los Angeles, 1/2008
Drs. J. House, Schwartz, Wilkinson, and Stefan
BAHA Intenso, 6/2008
no facial, balance, or vision problems either before or after surgery ... just hearing loss
Monmouth County, NJ

ChrisB

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thoughts?
« Reply #28 on: September 25, 2009, 09:07:46 pm »
Amy,

Your audiologist is, of course, correct about highly amplified sound on one side being able to be "picked up" on the other side.  When I had my original hearing test after losing 100% hearing on my left side, my audiologist had to do considerable masking in the right (good) ear while the highest volumes were being fed to the left ear - otherwise I'd hear what was going into my left ear on the right side.  So I can say from personal experience it works.  Second, over the course of the past 3 years, my ability to pick up bone-conducted sound in my good ear has improved remarkably.  I can lightly rub my hand across the hair on my "bad" side and actually hear that through bone conduction if there is no other sound or if I've got my good ear plugged.

If the air conduction approach works for you, great!  But before you make a final decision I would suggest possible additional consideration of the TransEar, if you're not completely sure about the air conduction hearing aid.  I strongly disagree that the TransEar has to be uncomfortable, let alone painful - particularly once it's properly fitted.  If it hurts, it needs to be slightly sanded down in the spot corresponding to where the irritation is inside the ear.  It may take a few tries at that, but once it's done, you're set from then on.  My first one hurt like crazy, and my audiologist (then) told me I'd get used to it, or my ear canal would stretch out, or something like that.  So I endured it about a week until I could not stand the pain.  It turned out I'd worn a significant "hole" in my ear canal.  She thought it had gone to the bone, but the ENT doc checked and said it was just a pretty significant ulcer.  I went without the TransEar for another week.  The audiologist did an absolute no-no (especially for one not well experienced with the TransEar) and put it on her grinder.  That instantly took off too much, and I had feedback problems forever after, and could never run it at the volume level it is designed to run at.  It was eventually remade by the TransEar folks, better fitted, and was passable until I got the new model earlier this year (from a different, patient, highly competent audiologist).  It fit too tight, and was immediately sanded down a little at a time (VERY fine sand paper that TransEar supplies with the device), and I went home.  The next day I returned and some more needed to be taken off.  A little more sanding at a time and I was in great shape!  (Haven't been back to the audiologist now in 4 months.)  A good audiologist can get you the same results if they do it right.  And it isn't really all that much work.  As you see here, there are a number of very satisfied TransEar users who were able to get a good fit in one or more additional visits in the first few days or weeks - that's all.  And since there's a free trial period with the TransEar also, it might be worth a try.

As for it being hard to program?  Not if the audiologist can follow instructions and is willing to work with (i.e. talk to) the TransEar folks - even while they're doing programming adjustments.  The TransEar people have been really good about working with the audiologists about programming and fitting (when needed)

Yes, I have a behind-the-ear (BTE) portion (the electronic "brains" of the TransEar), as well as the in-the-ear portion.  But I've long since lost any uncomfortability or sensitivity to it.  I don't notice it at all during the day unless I specifically think about it, or if I bend way over and it moves out of place or something else unusual happens.  And the newest model TransEar is visible in the ear, but VERY unobtrusive in my opinion.  I had the original "dinosaur" model only a year or so after it was first approved.  It was a full shell and was flush with the outside edge of the ear.  This new one sits a bit more in, and is only a half-shell.  Would I LIKE to go without a BTE piece?  Of course.  But do I mind what I've got?  Not at all anymore.

I also want to stress what someone else said above.  The frequency response of the new model is far better than the original, and comprehension of the tough consonants is far better than before as a result.  If I remember correctly, it peaks around 2000 or 2100 hz, whereas the old model was around 700-800 hz if I remember correctly.  They really did a great job on the research and engineering of this new model, in my opinion.  I could hear and experience the difference within the first minutes of trying it out in a previously rough environment.

Oh  - one other thing.  I had some vibration with my first TransEar, but don't feel ANY with my newest generation model.  The TransEar doesn't use sound - it uses vibration.  I suspect you could run into a problem with that if you're blasting high-volume sound into the bad ear.

Whatever you decide to do, it's got to be comfortable for you.  The air conduction device may be just fine - I can't compare the two.  I just wanted to let you know that perhaps the TransEar might be worth re-considering.  It's certainly not for everyone, but with 100% deafness in your bad ear and good hearing on your good side, you may be a great candidate for trying it.

Best of luck!

Chris

leapyrtwins

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Re: Saw a terrific audiologist and he says go with normal hearing aid!! Thought
« Reply #29 on: September 25, 2009, 09:25:01 pm »
You are confused?  I wonder why.

The transear can be difficult to adjust and the skin that is deep inside your ear is very sensitive.  The BAHA is a surgical procedure.  This might be a cheaper, easier, possibly more comfortable option to explore.

Amy -

Sam Rush certainly knows what a BAHA is and what it entails.  In addition to being a doctor, Sam has had his BAHA longer than I've had mine :)

The more I read this thread, the more confused I become - even after reading your doc's explanation.  I guess I just can't phathom why you'd want to try something that doesn't work well - from your own description of it.

As for the cleaning of the skin for a BAHA - I'm confused by this too.  There really is nothing to caring for your BAHA site - I don't do anything special (just shampoo in the shower daily).  I have had no irritation or infection.  I can understanding not wanting to have something drilled into your skull, as I said the BAHA isn't for everyone - the surgery, however, truly is a piece of cake.

Jan
Retrosig 5/31/07 Drs. Battista & Kazan (Hinsdale, Illinois)
Left AN 3.0 cm (1.5 cm @ diagnosis 6 wks prior) SSD. BAHA implant 3/4/08 (Dr. Battista) Divino 6/4/08  BP100 4/2010 BAHA 5 8/2015

I don't actually "make" trouble..just kind of attract it, fine tune it, and apply it in new and exciting ways